Sebastião Salgado: The silent drama of photography

Sebastião Salgado is a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist born on February 8, 1944 and has traveled in over 100 countries for his photographic projects. Most of these have appeared in numerous press publications and books. Touring exhibitions of this work have been presented throughout the world. Longtime gallery director Hal Gould considers Salgado to be the most important photographer of the early 21st century.

Salgado is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. He was awarded Foreign Honorary Membership of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1992  and was awarded the Royal Photographic Society’s Centenary Medal and Honorary Fellowship (HonFRPS) in 1993.

Between 2004 and 2011, Salgado worked on “Genesis,” aiming at the presentation of the unblemished faces of nature and humanity. It consists of a series of photographs of landscapes and wildlife, as well as of human communities that continue to live in accordance with their ancestral traditions and cultures. This body of work is conceived as a potential path to humanity’s rediscovery of itself in nature.

In September and October 2007, Salgado displayed his photographs of coffee workers from India, Guatemala, Ethiopia and Brazil at the Brazilian Embassy in London. The aim of the project was to raise public awareness of the origins of the popular drink.

In his TED talk, he discussed about photography and it’s beauty and mentioned about his deeply personal story of craft that almost killed him showing some amazing photographs. Must Watch..!!

 

 

 

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