Breaking barriers with quantum physics | Dr. Shohini Ghose | TEDxNickelCity

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Dr. Shohini Ghose talks about how the laws of quantum mechanics may be harnessed to develop next generation computers and novel protocols like teleportation.

Shohini Ghose is an Associate Professor of Physics and Computer Science at
Wilfrid Laurier University and an Affiliate of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.

She and her co-workers also made the first-ever movies of cesium atoms that demonstrate how the “butterfly effect” of chaos can impact quantum correlations or ‘entanglement’.

Dr. Ghose was awarded the prestigious Sera Bangali award for her contributions to science and she is also a member of the TED Fellowship for 2014. With much accolades and accomplishments, Dr. Ghose is also the founding Director for Wilfrid Laurier University’s Centre for Women in Science which aims to build a diverse community in science through research, action and communication.

She also recently co-authored the first Canadian undergraduate Introductory Astronomy textbook, which is now being used in several universities in Canada.

 

Music Saved My Life | Arn Chorn-Pond | TEDxWarwick

Arn Chorn-Pond is an internationally-renowned human rights activist, community organizer, and musician who inspires change through his incredible stories of surviving the Cambodian Khmer Rouge genocide.

When the Khmer Rouge took over Cambodia in 1975, Arn was sent to a children’s labor camp. There, he escaped death by playing his flute for the camp guards. He later reached a refugee camp in Thailand, where Reverend Peter Pond adopted him in 1980. In the U.S., Arn began a series of community rebuilding projects and founded several organizations. In the mid-1990’s, he returned to Cambodia to find his family and his music teacher. He “discovered” other artists who had survived the war and were living in difficult conditions; Cambodian Living Arts was born.

Arn was one of the first recipients of the Reebok Human Rights Award in 1988 and is also the recipient of the Anne Frank Memorial Award, the Kohl Foundation International Peace Prize and two honorary doctorates for peace and humanitarian service.

Origin of the Moon | The Royal Society

The origin of Earth’s moon has fascinated mankind for thousands of years and has received scientific attention for over forty years, building on the return of rocks from the moon and the growing understanding of planet formation. The central idea of a giant impact on Earth is widely accepted and physically appealing but the constraints imposed by isotopic geochemistry, in particular, have proved daunting. Alex Halliday talks about an issue he has organised for Philosophical Transactions A that summarises the current state of our understanding and the challenges that still remain.

Credits: The Royal Society.

Quantum mechanics at the macroscopic scale – Mark Kasevich (SETI Talks 2016)

Quantum mechanics is a foundation of physics, chemistry and materials science. Still, there is an ongoing debate about the emergence of the classical, macroscopic world from the well-understood microscopic world of quantum mechanics. We contribute to this discourse by demonstrating quantum superposition of massive particles at the distance (0.5 m) and time scales (2 s) of everyday life, thereby advancing the state-of-the-art of atom de Broglie wave interferometry by nearly two orders of magnitude [1]. In addition to testing a central tenet of quantum mechanics, we pave the way for new precision tests of gravity, including the possible observation of gravitational waves and tests of the equivalence principle. In related experimental work, we demonstrate that entangled clusters of approximately 1000 atoms can be used to achieve 10-fold improvement in the sensitivity of quantum sensors based on atomic transitions; the levels of performance achieved could not have been realized with any competing (non-entangled) method.

The American Bald Eagle – National Geographic Documentary

– The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, from Greek hali “sea”, aiētos “eagle”, leuco “white”, cephalos “head”) is a bird of prey found in North America. A sea eagle, it has two known sub-species and forms a species pair with the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). Its range includes most of Canada and Alaska, all of the contiguous United States, and northern Mexico. It is found near large bodies of open water with an abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting.

The bald eagle is an opportunistic feeder which subsists mainly on fish, which it swoops down and snatches from the water with its talons. It builds the largest nest of any North American bird and the largest tree nests ever recorded for any animal species, up to 4 m (13 ft) deep, 2.5 m (8.2 ft) wide, and 1 metric ton (1.1 short tons) in weight. Sexual maturity is attained at the age of four to five years.


 

 

Controlling Mood in Portraits: Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey

The mood of a portrait comes from many things. Lighting, posing and Photoshop processing are three of the many variables that a photographer can control. In this video Gavin Hoey creates two shots with different moods and talks you through the steps he takes to create the final look. And also visit: http://www.adorama.com/ for more details